How to Search for Kids Science Experiments on the Internet

The internet can be a useful  tool in finding  the best science experiment  if you have an energetic and inquisitive kid.  Doing your own at-home science project is a great way to engage your child’s active mind. In some cases, your child’s school might actually require the completion of a science project as part of their curriculum.

When looking online, you can easily find databases of detailed science projects for kids, especially if you narrow the search by being a bit more specific. For example, if your child is studying or is interested in earth sciences, a search for “kid’s science experiments, earth science” might yield projects about earthquakes, erosion models, or studies of how fossils are made.

 You can also search more generally for science experiment databases like those found at http://www.akronlibrary.org/DBS/SFDB/Default.aspx or http://www.youth.net/nsrc/sci/sci.index.html, where you can search a massive inventory of science experiments with more specific parameters like the grade your child is in, the type of experiment, or field of science. If you don’t have time to browse through too large a database, a great sure bet is the science project guide at  http://www.24hourscienceprojects.com/guide.pdf, a wonderful resource for finding kids science experiments on the internet. 24 Hour Science Projects are also great as they come complete with the entire topic headers typically used in school science projects such as purpose, hypothesis, procedure, observations, results, and conclusion. 

You are sure to be able to find a great experiment, no matter what your child’s specific interests, and hopefully learn a great deal, as well as have fun doing it. 

Get your science experiment for your kid today at

24 Hour Science Projects!

Science Projects for Eighth Graders

One of the best strategies for finding the right science project for your eighth grader would be to consult with their science teacher, especially if the science project was assigned through school. By asking for some ideas from the teacher, you’ll be able to clarify all of the project guidelines and requirements, and be able to find a project that is relevant to your student’s course work. 

Another great place to find good eighth grade science projects would be your local library. At the library you’ll find lots of science project books with helpful project ideas and explanations, all of which are from a reliable source. Additionally, if you need any help finding something suitable for your eighth grader, at a library you can always ask for the help of a librarian to point you in the right direction. 

Finally, the internet is a great way to find eighth grade science projects, but with so much information out there, you have to know where to start. You can do a general search, but it might be wise to be more specific, looking for “8th grade science projects, earth sciences” or “8th grade science projects, physics,” depending on what your student is interested in. You can also find great online guides, often for free, that are loaded with science projects, directions on what materials you’ll need and how to complete them. To get started finding a science project idea, you can try the free project guides at  http://www.middle-school-science-projects.com/guide.pdf

Get your science experiement for your kid today at

24 Hour Science Project!

How to Find Science Experiments for Kids

Kids of all ages are always curious about how the world works, why things are the way they are, or how stuff works. By engaging their attention with a fun science experiment, you can help them understand the world around them, and hopefully have fun at the same time. Unless you’re a teacher or scientist though, it might be tricky to know what experiments are best, what materials you need, or what to look for in an experiment. Luckily, if you know where to look, you just might have access to lots of great kids science experiment ideas in places you visit everyday.

Public libraries or school libraries often carry books geared toward children full of fun and age appropriate projects. Be sure to look for one with good instructions and pictures to help you along. Your child’s teacher or science teacher might also be a great resource for finding a science experiment. Asking a teacher is also a good idea, as they might be able to help you find a kids science experiment idea that is relevant to what your child’s class is studying in science at that time. Finally, the internet has many websites geared toward science experiments for kids. Searching for kids science experiments will yield tons of helpful results, many of which are free like the science project guides you can find at  http://www.24hourscienceprojects.com/guide.pdf  Remember to have fun by doing a project your child is interested in, and always be safe!

Get your science experiments for your kid at

24 Hour Science Projects!

Fun Science Projects

Don’t look now, but it’s science fair time – time to search for those fun science projects…that also have to be educational. They’re not easy to find, but they do exist. Here are some wildly fun science projects. Some of these are so cool that you’ll do them later just for the fun of it!
24 Hour Science Fair Topics:
fun science project

Finding a fun science project isn’t impossible. Whether you’re looking for an experiment or a demonstration, there are some great ideas that don’t cost a lot, are easy to do, and will teach your child basic scientific practices. We have four sons, and over the years we’ve done more projects than we can count. Here are some of our boys’ favorites:

• Find out which citrus fruit has the most Vitamin C? Make a solution with iodine and starch (it’s EASY to do!), and test different kinds of citrus juices to see which contains the most vitamin C.

• Take the shell of an egg – without boiling it. This wildly fun project is so cool you’ll do it over again for the sheer fascination of it! Soak a raw egg in vinegar, and the shell will come off. The egg membrane is so tough that the shell-less egg will bounce!

• Show how yeast gives of gas. Place a yeast and sugar solution into a bottle, put a balloon on top, and watch the yeast have so much gas that the balloon blows up!

• Watch static electricity work. Grab your wool socks, make a little piece of aluminum foil bounce between your finger and a pie plate.

• Use toy cars to find out about friction! Set up a hot wheels track, and find out how far they will roll across different floor surfaces.

• Are two ears better than one? Hide a ticking clock in a room, and send your friends in to find it – half using both ears, and half with one ear blocked with a cotton ball. (Birthday party idea?!)

These science projects are part of all the fun science projects in the 24 Hour Science Project package. They are easy to design on your own, visit 24 Hour Science Projects to find out how to purchase step by step instructions for each.

Middle School Science Projects – They’re Here!

Need middle school science projects? A whole new set of science project has just been developed – with science fair topics that are perfect for middle school! In fact, the projects are called just that: Middle School Science Projects. There are five fabulous topics:
science fair topics for middle school
1. How does hair change as a result of different hair care products?. Girls are especially interested in doing a science project about hair. In this project, we treat hair, then test its strength.

2. How does the type of soil affect water flow? This experiment involves doing a soil analysis – which is fascinating – and then seeing how water flows – or drips – through.

3. What makes yeast grow best? This yeast project finds out what that little fungus likes to eat best. Balloons are involved – and gas.

4. What’s the best model for a solar heater? You can scavenge through the trash to find the elements to build this solar heater that really works!

2. Does the amount of Vitamin C in Orange juice change over time? This is a slightly more advanced version of the popular Vitamin ‘C’itrus’ project.

Check all these projects out today at the Middle School Science Projects site!

Kayla Fay

PS You don’t have to wait for the new package. Get a free science project guide here.

Supplies for Other Projects – and Homework, Too!

It’s not just science projects. In general, school, homework and learning can be a real struggle for many children – I know this firsthand from watching my boys. Early on, I decided that my guys should never have to look far for the proper tools. Like a busy executive, they needed to concentrate on the task before them, and should have anything they need close at hand. There is a closet in our house that looks like the school supply section at Wal-Mart. The boys have tools to stay organized. They have plenty of socks, underwear, and soccer clothes. We have calculators, computers, dictionaries, encyclopedia, rulers, compasses, and yes, we keep spare science boards. (We even keep completed projects, as you may have read in the post about doing science projects with more than one kid.

To prepare for this article, I walked through my house and made a list of the supplies we keep on hand. This list can be a springboard for getting supplies ready for your children. Let this list help you as you help your children to help themselves.

Lots of pencils
Erasers
Pens
Markers – wide tip & fine point
Permanent markers
Highlighters in several colors
Zip lock bags – all sizes
Protractors
Compass
Rulers
Glue and glue sticks
Spray adhesive
Scotch tape – wide and thin
Duct tape and packing tape
Sticky tack
Thumb tacks
Paper clips
Paper fasteners
Index cards
LOTS of Notebook paper, wide and college rule
Notebooks – 1 & 3 subject in both rules-
with the THICK cardboard covers
Graph paper
Graph paper NOTEBOOKS (invaluable for math)
Card stock in white and colors
Colored computer paper
Construction paper
Science boards

White drawing paper
Folders – pocket and prong
Manilla file folders
Envelopes – including large yellow ones
Full sheets of sticker paper
Labels
Newsprint, bought for $1 at the newspaper office
Pencil cases
Bookbags (one of the boys broke his yesterday
and I was grateful we had a spare)
Notebook dividers
Looseleaf binders in several sizes
Sheet protectors
Baby food jars
Old magazines – including National Geographic, Science Journal
given away free by our local library
Tempera paint
Globe
Wall Map
Atlas
Old set of encyclopedias and science journals
Dictionary
Thesaurus
Electronic Dictionary – for the short definitions
and the easy look up
Calculators, some cheap, some not
Extra Ink Cartridges
Memory sticks/thumb drives

I’m quite aware that this is a LOT of stuff. But you’re going to buy it anyway. Cut down on the stress and buy it in advance. Science project time will be here before you know it!

And while you’re getting supplies, add our free science project guide at http://www.www.middle-school-science-projects.com.

Elementary Science Projects

elementary science ProjectsElementary School teachers almost always require students to do at least one science project before they finish the fifth grade. Elementary science projects are easy to find, but finding the right project for your child can be a challenge. Here are five hints to help you find the best project for your grade school child.

1. Find out what type of project your science teacher requires. There are many types of projects, and most elementary schools give a range of choices. Does your teacher want an experiment, a demonstration, a collection, a report, or a model? Knowing what kind of project you need will narrow down your choices considerably.

2. Make a list of things that interest your child. What subjects catch your child’s eye on television or in books – space, animals, buildings, computers, explosions? Does your child need instant gratification? Consider a chemistry experiment with dramatic results, such as “Which Fruit has the Most Vitamin C?” Is your child concerned about the environment? Find out which toilet tissue is most biodegradable, or which type of insulation works best.

3. Set your budget for money – and time. If you don’t have a lot of money to invest, and if your time is limited, there is no need to look at anything that requires special metals to be imported from the Far East. Decide on how much cash you’re willing to spend, and create a generous time line for getting supplies. Keep in mind that you have to actually do the project after the supplies arrive.

4. Keep in mind that this is a science project for elementary school. Don’t choose a project with complicated instructions. You want your child to do the project with your help – and not the other way around.

5. Provide four or five science project choices. Ever notice how it takes longer to decide on an ice cream flavor when there are 31 flavors? Give your elementary school child a limited list of science project choices, and you’ll both be happier.

Parents, get a free guide to science projects– including how to find experiments with step by step instructions – at Elementary Science Projects.

Our project guides are easy and fast, and will help you submit an outstanding – and maybe winning – science project for elementary school.

Human Behavior Science Projects – For Humans Who Sometimes Behave

Are two ears better than one?

Are two ears better than one?

Human Behavior Science Projects explore the fascinating ways that human beings behave. Behavioral projects are a popular choice for kids headed to the science fair. While gathering enough test subjects can be tricky, these projects can be a great way for students to learn about testing, meet interesting people, and have fun. There are so many things to discover, that the hardest part may be simply choosing a topic. Here’s a list of ideas to get you started.

1. Determine the soothing effect of music by taking the pulse before and after a five minute session of classical piano.

2. See if more people are visual learners or auditory learners by having humans memorize a telephone number that they only see, then a different one that they only hear.

3. Discover if wearing glasses helps or hurts a salesperson’s profit. Have a salesperson wear glasses for a series of days, then go to work without the glasses. Compare their total sales for the two periods.

4. Find out if yawning is contagious behavior by watching a group of children before and after the group leader yawns. Note that because it is such a primitive reflex, yawning is a very popular human behavior science project subject.

5. Are younger children more inclined to like their teachers than older students? Rate the popularity of teachers that teach different ages of kids.

6. Measure the time it takes for children to learn a poem set to music or not set to music.

7. Find out if the scent of lemon helps attention by calculating test scores of people who have or have not sniffed a lemon. This is a great science project that might help ADHD students!

8. Find out if two ears or one are better at localizing a sound by hiding an object, and timing how long individuals take to find it. (Get a complete project guide for this project at Online Science Projects.)

Of course, you don’t need a study of human behavior to know that students like to come up with new and unique ideas. So put on your thinking cap and come up with your own human behavior science project!

Need more ideas?! Get your FREE parents guide to science projects at http://www.24hourscienceprojects.com. We also have a list of many types of science experiments and projects.

Five Ideas for an Earth Science Project

Earth science projects are an amazing way for kids to become interested in science as well as the earth around them. “Earth sciences” covers a lot of territory – no pun intended – which gives kids a lot of choices for experimenting. Here are five great ideas for an earth science project:

1. Find out if salt affects the boiling point of water. Using distilled water, measure the temperature at which water boils with different amounts of salt added. This easy experiment can be done fast – in under an hour! Got more info here: “Does Salt Affect the Boiling Point of Water?

2. Test types of insulation to see which works best. Freeze bottles of water, insulate them with various building materials, and see which one stays frozen the longest. This is science project is great for students concerned about our environment. Instructions can be found at 24 Hour Science Projects.

3. Make a tornado. Simply half fill a clear 2 liter soda bottle with water, and swirl it until it makes a tornado. This is an easy elementary demonstration, that probably won’t win the science fair, but will fascinate younger students while allowing them to observe swirling currents. (We bet you’ll get a kick out of it, too!)

4. Measure the amount of oxygen that is in air. Put duct tape on a hand warmer, activate it, and quickly tape it to the bottom of a tall jar. Invert the jar and put the mouth into a pan of water. As the hand warmer heats up, it will use up the oxygen in the glass, causing the water level to rise. If you’re traveling to and from the mountains and compare the amounts of oxygen, this is a great experiment. Otherwise, it’s a cool demonstration.

5. Compare brands of toilet tissue to see which is most biodegradable. Collect samples of different brands of tissue, weigh them, soak them in water so they break down. After 24 hours, rinse the samples through a funnel, then weigh the rest. Get the instructions for this earth science project called “A Straight Flush“.

Get information on how to find detailed instructions for earth science projects when you get your free parent’s guide to science projects – are at http://www.24hourscienceprojects.com.

Facebook Fan Page

Today we decided to make ourselves a Facebook Fan Page. Since most kids spend a good amount of time on Facebook and MySpace, we think it’s a great place to share pictures of science projects and experiments from our guides – or not!

Here’s our page:

Won’t you be our fan?!

Marsher Gaming